Top 10 reasons for visiting Lyon
Jan02

Top 10 reasons for visiting Lyon

Flybe, Europe’s largest regional airline, fly daily from my home city of Southampton to Lyon in France. Lyon is a city I have come to love and the fact that it is now connected by air without having to go through London and Paris means I will probably visit more often. Eurostar now have a service to Lyon from London without the need to change trains thus making Lyon more convenient to get to. They say Paris is the heart of France and Lyon is the stomach. Lyon is awash with restaurants with many holding Michelin stars. Certainly Lyon is the gastro-capital of France. However, there is more to Lyon than food as you will see from the list below. They are not ranked but rather listed according to approximate geographical location. 1. The Fourviere Basilica The Fourviere Basilica, perched high above the city on Fourviere Hill is dedicated to the Virgin Mary, the patron saint of Lyon. It is fortress on the outside and palatial place of worship on the inside. The large terraced area around it makes a great viewpoint for looking across the city of Lyon and getting your bearings. Directly below is Vieux Lyon with its narrow cobbled streets and old houses. Beyond and between the Rivers Saone and Rhone is Renaissance Lyon with long boulevards and large open squares. Beyond the two rivers is 19th and 20th century Lyon. 2. Gallo-Roman Archaeological Park To the south and out of sight from the Fourviere Basilica is theGallo-Roman Archaeological park. This contains a large Roman theatre built around 15 BC that seated 11,000 spectators and a smaller second century odeon which was used mainly for music and recitations. Between the two and above the theatre is a well preserved Roman road lined with the ruins of shops and other buildings. Today both amphitheatres are used for performances during “Les Nuits de Fourviere”, a summer festival. 3. The Traboules of Vieux Lyon In Vieux Lyon, which itself is worth exploring (see Five in the Fifth), are the traboules. Traboule comes from the latin words trans ambulare meaning “to cross”. The geography of the land meant the streets were constructed parallel to the river Saone. The traboules are passageways through houses connecting one street with another and were constructed intitially for people to fetch water and goods from the river. As the silk trade grew, the traboules were used to move goods around the city more easily. Traboules run through the houses which gives you the feeling of entering a private, almost secretive world. Not all are open to the public and even those that are are difficult to find. The best way to visit them is...

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Lyon between the Rivers Saone and Rhone
Jan21

Lyon between the Rivers Saone and Rhone

Lyon is a city I passed through several times either on the A6 Autoroute heading south or on a train heading towards the Mediterranean coast. I have used its airport as well when heading to other parts of Rhone-Alpes. Such contact with Lyon gave the false impression it was a city of dreariness and heavy industry. It was time therefore to have more than a fleeting glimpse of the city. I have already explored Vieux Lyon on the west bank of the Saone in a previous post on France Unpacked’s sister website Travel Unpacked. In this post I will explore that part of Lyon between it’s two great rivers the Saone and the Rhone; an area known as the Presqu’île. It is quite a compact area and is where the Lyonnais come to shop, eat and be entertained. Most of it can be explored on foot. However, all the city’s transport systems pass through or terminate in the Presqu’île so it is easy to get around. The Place des Terreaux is a good place to start as it is the de facto transport hub both above and below ground. The most striking feature of this square is, for me, the great fountain of a female charioteer and wildly straining horses. Rejected by Bordeaux this fountain was eagerly accepted by Lyon. Its creator, Batholdi, later went on to create the Statue of Liberty. The fountain faces the Museum of Fine Arts which is housed in the Palais St Pierre. The courtyard is a cool secluded place where sculptures are displayed, some of which are by the sculptor Rodin. The Hôtel de Ville with its elegant 17th century facade also overlooks the square and its many cafes. The Opera on Place de la Comédie behind Hôtel de Ville was built in 1826 but was completely redesigned in the 1990s. Externally the facades were left pretty much intact but a glass vaulted roof was added giving it, in my opinion, the appearance of a London mainline railway station. Contemporary sculptures and fountains fill the squares around it. Lyon is twinned with Birmingham and the two cities share a contemporary and controversially designed department store. In Birmingham the store is covered with silver discs and in Lyon it is reflective glass. Both modern structures are surrounded by older buildings but in Lyon at least these are reflected in the facade. Rue Mercière is the only significant Renaissance remains in the Presqu’île. There are a few traboules or secret passageways here connecting it to the bank of the River Saone. Restaurants, bistros and cafes line the street. Le Bistrot de Lyon serves great food and is...

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Pairing Food and Rhone-Alpes waters
Mar14

Pairing Food and Rhone-Alpes waters

“Water is the new wine” and the Rhone-Alpes region has plenty of it. Apart from snow and ice, numerous lakes and innumerable streams and rivers the region has over 30 sources of mineral water both still and sparkling. If you thought water had no taste then think again. I spent time discovering some of the sources and was introduced to the water tasting in St Galmier, home of Badoit mineral water. To read more about it visit France Unpacked’s sister website www.travelunpacked.co.uk I discovered that in Rhone-Alpes alone there is such a variety of tastes; from the salty, slightly bitter Badoit though the meadowy sweet Thonon to the almost neutral Evian. The following is a brief summary of the tastes and aromas of some of the better known and more readily available mineral waters of the Rhone-Alpes. The still waters: Thonon: Slightly lemony with a fresh meadowy scent; sweet taste Evian: Light marine aroma; a neutral balance between salty and acidic taste Aix: Dry earthy scent: no dominant taste, well balanced The sparkling waters: Badoit (verte): Little discernible aroma; salty, sweet and bitter, well balanced taste between the three Badoit (rouge); A hint of woodiness; taste is salty and slightly bitter Vals: Little discernible smell; salty and bitter in taste Saint Alban: Lightly metallic scent; sweet and salty, well balanced Cesar: aromatic notes of almonds and lemon; an acidic and bitter taste Vernet: Slightly metallic aroma with an earthy note; an acidic and salty taste Parot: Complex scent, flowery, vanilla with a note of leather; a dominant salty taste If you think it is beginning to sound a lot like the terminology used by wine tasters you would be right. Much of the vocabulary and the classification of taste and feel is borrowed from wine-tasting. Water, just like wine, can be paired with different foods. Of course it is all down to personal taste but the characteristics of the different mineral waters pair well with certain meals or courses. The light but aromatic Aix is ideal as an aperitif as its slightly woody scent would be lost during the meal. The more intense scent of wood and almonds and the slightly lemony bitter taste of Cesar would go well with a salad particularly one with a vinegar based dressing. Arcens has a lively effervescence with an acidic salty taste and pairs well with more exotic spicy dishes. However its high sodium content (290mg/l) makes it unsuitable for people on a salt-free diet. For any fish dish the slightly salty Parot with a nose reminiscent of the sea is ideal. It has a smooth silky texture and fine effervescence. This...

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Evian and water
Feb10

Evian and water

The word naive comes to us, via French, from the Latin nativus meaning native or natural. When spelt backwards naive becomes evian a name we associate with natural mineral water. Coincidence? Probably. There was settlement during town Celtic and Roman times which was later named Aviano, then Yvian and finally Evian. This was long before the curative properties of the mineral springs were discovered and the town was given the name Evian.  The “les-Bains” part of the name was added later to promote the town as a spa resort.I arrived in the spa town Evian-les-Bains at the end of a visit to the Rhone-Alpes investigating some of the 32 mineral waters of the region. You cannot write about the mineral waters of the Rhone-Alpes without mentioning Evian. The famous baby blue and pink label of the water bottled here is recognisable the world over. Water, in and out of bottles, is ubiquitous in Evain-les-Bains. Evian-les-Bains is on the shores of Europe’s largest lake; Lac Leman. It was not until 1789 that the mineral water was discovered by Marquis de Lessert. Drinking regularly from St Catherine’s Spring in the garden of Monsieur Cachat apparently cured him of kidney stones. Word spread, the entrepreneurs and investors moved in and, during the Belle Epoque, a resort was developed. Four springs now provide Evian-les-Bains with its raison d’etre and feed the local economy. The rain and snow that fall on the Alps above the town take 15 years to filter down through the strata gathering minerals on its way. This is the water we drink today as Evian. The original spring, known as the Cachat Spring, is still there; the fountain now surrounded by a classical portico. The water here is free to all comers and residents are allowed to fill bottles to take home. I am sure it tastes better gushing out of the ground than in a plastic bottle. Immediately below the fountain is the Art Nouveau Evian Buvette Thermale which houses an exhibition on Evian water, a shop where you can purchase Evian products, including their cosmetics, and a collection of Evian bottles including their much sought after limited editions. Le Palais Lumiere, a rather grand edifice overlooking the lake, is a fine example of Belle Epoque era architecture. Until 1984 it was Evian-les-Bains thermal baths. Now it is a conference and exhibition centre with an art gallery. The entrance hall is the magnificent pump room and is free to enter. Spas and “baths” were very popular and some very grand hotels were built . Many of these remain today along with some more modern ones. Evian-les-Bains is still very...

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